How Accurate Is: The Social Network (Movie, 2010) Part 2

Facebook's headquarters beginning in 2009, a far cry from their newest building, which has an entire park on the roof.
Facebook’s headquarters beginning in 2009, a far cry from their newest building, which has an entire park on the roof.

Hello everyone! Because I know you are tired of this site only ever pointing out mistakes, today I am going to do a post on the things The Social Network did right. Please do not assume my previous post means the movie was entirely inaccurate; all this website tries to do is educate people on historical inaccuracies so that their views of historical events are not coloured by inaccuracies in popular media. With that said, here are several things that the movie did well.

  • The emails and blog posts present in the beginning of the film appear to have been quoted exactly as written; these were not dramatizations for the purposes of the plot.[1]
  • The depiction of Facemash crashing the Harvard networks was partially accurate; the Harvard Crimson says “traffic to the website was so heavy that [Zuckerberg] could not even log on to his own computer.”[2]
  • Zuckerberg’s anecdote about constructing a program that Microsoft wanted to buy appears to have been accurate; the program in question was named Synapse. Also true is the fact that he turned them down.[3]
  • The role of Eduardo in the business appears to have been related correctly, regardless of any disputes about the nature of his eviction from the company; he was, in fact, the first investor in the company.[4]

For more, continue past the link.

All told, The Social Network was not an especially inaccurate film; nor was it an especially accurate one. As in most Hollywood films with “true stories” as their backbone, truth is often sacrificed for the sake of the plot, but it is equally often not. This is especially true with such a dramatic story as the founding of Facebook. Few films could receive a perfect score from this website, and as a result the reviews presented here may often seem harsh; however, fewer films could receive a zero. This was a enjoyable film regardless of its flaws (particularly Jesse Eisenberg as Zuckerberg, a role he seemed born to play), and definitely one I would recommend. I hope you all enjoyed, and have a good day!

References:

1 Business Insider. “How Facebook Was Founded”. Last modified March 2010.

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-facebook-was-founded-2010-3?op=1

2 The Harvard Crimson. “Hot or Not? Website Briefly Judges Looks.” Last modified November 2003.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2003/11/4/hot-or-not-website-briefly-judges/?page=single

3 The New Yorker. “The Face of Facebook.” Last modified September 2010.

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/09/20/the-face-of-facebook

4 Business Insider. “How Facebook Was Founded”. Last modified March 2010.

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-facebook-was-founded-2010-3?op=1

 

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